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Published on June 8th, 2020 | by Lydia Brooks

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6 things you didn’t know about hip hop culture (Part 1)

Over the past 20 years, Hip-hop has been growing and dominating many music charts around the world.

Hiphop culture has a very attractive development history, and here are 6 things about Hiphop that you may not know:

1. Hiphop’s birthday

Hip-hop is a genre of music and cultural trend dating back to the 1970s in the Bronx, New York. This culture comes from and grows in ‘ghetto’ areas (usually the concentrated housing of the poor, people of color, often associated with many social evils and gangs).

6 WHAT YOU DIDN'T KNOW ABOUT CULTURE HIPHOP 2

On August 11, 1973, Hiphop was born at a vibrant party in the Bronx, New York, at a birthday party for 16-year-old Jamaican boy Clive Campbell. The birthday of Hiphop is marked by DJ Kool Herc using 2 turntables to create a “scratch” effect (scratching disc), creating fun and ear-beat melodies, making all guests have to Dancing to the music during the party.

2. The most popular music of Hiphop is not Rap music

In many people’s minds, Hiphop is often associated with Rap. However, the most profound popular record in Hiphop is some vague songs from the recording box of DJ Herc such as: “It’s Just Begun – Jimmy Castor Bunch”; “Apachel – Incredible Bongo Band”; or “Take Me To The Mardi Gras” by Bob James”,

3. The word “Hiphop” was invented accidentally

The father of the name of the impressive culture is Keith “Cowboy” Wiggins – one of the first MCs, and a member of the Grandmaster Flash and Furious Five.

6 WHAT YOU DIDN'T KNOW ABOUT HIPHOP CULTURE 5

The word “Hiphop” was created while he imitated the rhythms of marching soldiers, mocking a friend who had just joined his army. For some reason, this phrase went into his stage activities and sometimes the Furious Five group was mistakenly referred to as “Hiphop” in a number of concerts.

DJ Lovebug Starski is said to be the first person to use the term to describe the general Hiphop culture, along with appearing in a print in 1981 Village Voice, talking about Bambaataa.

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